Eat, pack, read. 9 ways to make a difference

Fifty-four days into this presidency, I’m finding doable ways to make a difference, while balancing paid work, the laundry, and moments of joy.

What can one person do to make a difference? Here’s nine attainable actions:

1. Eat!

Eat out tomorrow and support immigrants. Rising Restaurants  All day Wednesday, March 15, more than two dozen Twin Cities restaurants are donating a portion of their proceeds to the Immigrant Law Center of Minnesota, to help cover costs for the many immigrants facing deportation.

2. Write

Also tomorrow, the Ides of March, mail a postcard to the White House for the Ides of Trump. Send the president a pink slip, demand his taxes, etc.IMG_20170307_073159

I’m writing Governor Mark Dayton asking that he veto anti-protester bills. I’d love to get lots of people to deliver Protest Postcards on a Stick, mini-protest signs to Governor’s office. We need free speech and the civil dissent, right to speak out against wrongs our government is doing.

3. Call

This Friday, March 17, call Carver County Attorney’s office, 952-361-1400 to demand that charges be dropped against Louis Hunter. Louis is charged with two counts of felony riot for protesting the police killing of his cousin, Philando Castile last July. If convicted, Louis faces ten years in prison, the same sentence facing the cop who killed Philando.

4. Pack

Monday, March 20, Pack the Courtroom to support Louis Hunter. Noon press conference outside the Ramsey Country Courthouse; 1:30 hearing.

5. Meet

The ACLU launched a new Freedom Cities campaign, to disable Trump’s deportation machine, using People Power, that’s all of us who want to make a difference. The first step is Continue reading “Eat, pack, read. 9 ways to make a difference”

#WhyIMarch

I am marching in DC, standing up for women’s rights, and the rights of all Americans to live safely. Read my friend Joan Peterson’s essay about why she will be marching.

commongunsense

photo of BarbaraI will be going to Washington DC on a bus from Duluth, Minnesota. There are two full buses of women traveling by bus who will sleep and eat on the bus to make our voices heard. We could have filled a third bus but the company could not find enough buses for those interested. In addition to the two full buses ( about 106 riders) there is another bus sponsored by a different group and a large group who are flying to DC. 8 buses are traveling from the Twin Cities area as well. There are now 1800 buses registered to arrive at RFK stadium Saturday morning and at least 200,000 who will be in DC to make sure the incoming President @realDonaldTrump understands that we will not sit back and allow issues that affect women and children to be weakened and eliminated.

Why do we march?

Why are we…

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Dark 2 Dawn – A Bike Ride Through Black History

Eileen On

“Was your master a righteous man?”

“He owned negroes, how righteous could he be?”

History came alive in the early morning hours at Fort Snelling as the bike tour met Dred Scott, an enslaved man made famous by the Supreme Court decision bearing his name.

Each summer the Major Taylor Bicycling Club of Minnesota hosts Dark 2 Dawn, an overnight bike tour of the Twin Cities. The tour stops highlight the history of African Americans in Minneapolis and St Paul.

At 2 am, the 2016 tour gathered fireside at Fort Snelling State Park to participate in a reenactment with Dred Scott. His story drew us in as he proudly talked of his pregnant wife, our empathy twisting as the reality of his child’s future was laid out before us. A child’s legal status as free or slave was set by the mother’s. Both Dred Scott and his wife Harriet were…

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Racial Injustice and Righteous Indignation

beyondtheglasswall

Why is it that every time people find a non-violent way to cry out against racial injustice blak-lives-matter-toowe find a way to turn it into an offense toward some group it has nothing to do with?  #BlackLivesMatter DOES NOT mean others don’t.  That was a leap we made.  And let me clarify here. When I say “we” I mean people who have not spent their lives feeling the brunt of racial injustice.  Additionally, #blacklivesmatter does not mean “blue lives” don’t matter.

“…they were crying out against INJUSTICE, not people…”

During the week Philando Castile and Alton Sterling were shot and killed I saw many of my friends and acquaintances become VERY vocal on social media.  They were sad, angry, scared, hopeless, etc… They cried out that Black Lives Matter because they felt like it give-me-our-huddled-massesneeded to be said.  At the same time, many who were arguably on the “other side of…

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