Dark 2 Dawn – A Bike Ride Through Black History

Eileen On

“Was your master a righteous man?”

“He owned negroes, how righteous could he be?”

History came alive in the early morning hours at Fort Snelling as the bike tour met Dred Scott, an enslaved man made famous by the Supreme Court decision bearing his name.

Each summer the Major Taylor Bicycling Club of Minnesota hosts Dark 2 Dawn, an overnight bike tour of the Twin Cities. The tour stops highlight the history of African Americans in Minneapolis and St Paul.

At 2 am, the 2016 tour gathered fireside at Fort Snelling State Park to participate in a reenactment with Dred Scott. His story drew us in as he proudly talked of his pregnant wife, our empathy twisting as the reality of his child’s future was laid out before us. A child’s legal status as free or slave was set by the mother’s. Both Dred Scott and his wife Harriet were…

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Racial Injustice and Righteous Indignation

beyondtheglasswall

Why is it that every time people find a non-violent way to cry out against racial injustice blak-lives-matter-toowe find a way to turn it into an offense toward some group it has nothing to do with?  #BlackLivesMatter DOES NOT mean others don’t.  That was a leap we made.  And let me clarify here. When I say “we” I mean people who have not spent their lives feeling the brunt of racial injustice.  Additionally, #blacklivesmatter does not mean “blue lives” don’t matter.

“…they were crying out against INJUSTICE, not people…”

During the week Philando Castile and Alton Sterling were shot and killed I saw many of my friends and acquaintances become VERY vocal on social media.  They were sad, angry, scared, hopeless, etc… They cried out that Black Lives Matter because they felt like it give-me-our-huddled-massesneeded to be said.  At the same time, many who were arguably on the “other side of…

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Guns, violence, and hope

We live with guns and violence and we can live with hope.

I have hope that we can change attitudes about gun violence, just as public health advocates have changed attitudes about smoking. Now we have fewer tobacco deaths. In time, if we change attitudes and laws, we can have fewer gun deaths.

I have hope because groups like Protect Minnesota are working to change attitudes and laws.

I see hope in the dimpled smile of Protect Minnesota’s new director Rev. Nancy Nord Bence. Energetic and upbeat, Nancy knows preventing gun violence isn’t quick work, it’s necessary work. She’s organizing groups of Minnesotans who want to make us safer: The Interfaith Alliance on Gun Safety, Health Care Coalition to Prevent Gun Violence, Teachers United for Gun Reform, Minnesotans OUT for Gun Safety, Coalition for Workplace Safety and Responsible Gun Owners of Minnesota.

The more Minnesotans who stand together, with neighbors, friends and colleagues, the more attitudes, and in time, laws, will change.

The first step in changing attitudes is understanding the facts about guns and violence.

The fact is, we have 90 gun deaths a day in America. 90. 90 deaths, every single day. Shooting deaths are so common that it takes an odd detail to make us pay attention. A mother pushing a baby stroller is shot. Her death makes national news, because she is the cousin of someone famous, a basketball star.

We pay attention to mass shootings and a few unusual everyday shootings, but often we hear nothing at all about the most common kind of gun death in America.

The fact is, most gun deaths are suicides. The fact is, suicides account for more than half the gun deaths in America. The fact is,  more than 80 percent of gun deaths in Minnesota.

The numbers are numbing, but please stay with me here.

We live with guns and violence and we can live with hope. We can do something about gun violence. We—meaning me and you and many others. We can do something, together.

ATTEND a September 15th fundraiser for Protect Minnesota at my house.

HEAR The Concert Across America to End Gun Violence. The Minneapolis concert at International Market Square is one of dozens scheduled nationwide for September 25th, a day to hear music and ideas of how to make communities safer. I’m happy to pay $15 for an afternoon of hope. Buy $15 tickets

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Choosing hope after grim news

The news is grim, again. Jacob.

Yesterday’s ugly details of Jacob Wetterling’s death stunned me. My legs felt leaden, my mind numb.

I decided to move ahead, to do what I had planned, marching in honor of Philando Castile, on the two-month anniversary of his death. At first, standing with other protesters outside Saint Paul’s City Hall, carrying a sign, “Liberty and Justice for ALL,” I was too sad to speak. Slowly, hearing the voices and energy of people around me, I found my voice again.

I find hope being with others, doing something. Marching with young people, old people, people of color and people my color, I see hope. I hear hope when we chant a call-and-response, “I-believe-that-we-can-win.” I believe, and have hope.

I remember hope, the thousands of people who marched and prayed, cried and searched in the days and weeks and months and years since Jacob’s abduction, October 22, 1989. I heard hope in Patty Wetterling’s voice many times over the years. Yesterday, her voice breaking, she talked about Jacob’s legacy. “He has taught us how to live, how to love, how to be fair, how to be kind.”

In times of grim news, we can choose to be fair, to be kind, to stand with others, marching, praying, singing. We can choose hope, a legacy of Jacob.

The sound of hope

I hear the sounds of hope in so many kinds of music. I hear hope in the Black Eyed Peas’ latest version of  Where is the Love?

Their music video shows haunting images of refugee children, portraits of people standing alone or together, scenes from the grim headlines.

Where is the Love?” washes over me, wiping away the inky dread that seems to coat the daily news.